SPIL 2014 – 2016

 

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Colorado for 2014-2016

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Colorado for 2014-2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
State: Colorado
Agency: Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Plan for: 2014-2016
Submitted in fiscal year: 2013
View grant H169A130009 in the Grant Award screen.
Part I: Assurances
Section 1: Legal Basis and Certifications
1.1 The designated State unit (DSU) eligible to submit the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL or the plan) and authorized under State law to perform the functions of the State under the State Independent Living Services (SILS) and Centers for Independent Living (CIL) programs. CO Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
1.2 The separate State agency eligible to submit the plan and authorized under State law to provide vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals who are blind. NA
1.3 The Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) that meets the requirements of section 705 of the Act and is authorized to perform the functions outlined in section 705(c) of the Act in the State.
CO Statewide Independent Living Council
1.4 The DSU and, if applicable, the separate State agency authorized to provide VR services to individuals who are blind, and the SILC are authorized to jointly develop, sign and submit this SPIL on behalf of the State, and have adopted or otherwise formally approved the SPIL. Yes
1.5 The DSU, and, if applicable, the separate State agency authorized to provide VR services to individuals who are blind, may legally carry out each provision of the plan and will comply with all applicable Federal statutes and regulations in effect with respect to the three-year period it receives funding under the SPIL. Yes
1.6 The SPIL is the basis for State operation and administration of the program. All provisions of the SPIL are consistent with State law. Yes
1.7 The representative of the DSU and, if applicable, of the separate State agency authorized to provide VR services to individuals who are blind, who has the authority under State law to receive, hold, and disburse Federal funds made available under the SPIL and to submit the SPIL jointly with the SILC chairperson is Todd Jorgensen, Acting Director, CO Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Section 2: SPIL Development
2.1 The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for:
• The provision of State independent living services;
• The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living;
• Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. Yes
2.2 The DSU and SILC conduct public meetings to provide all segments of the public, including interested groups, organizations and individuals, an opportunity to comment on the State plan prior to its submission to the Commissioner and on any revisions to the approved State plan. Yes
2.3 The DSU and SILC establish and maintain a written description of procedures for conducting public meetings in accordance with the following requirements. The DSU and SILC shall provide:
• appropriate and sufficient notice of the public meetings;
• reasonable accommodation to individuals with disabilities who rely on alternative modes of communication in the conduct of the public meetings, including providing sign language interpreters and audio-loops; and
• public meeting notices, written material provided prior to or at the public meetings, and the approved State plan in accessible formats for individuals who rely on alternative modes of communication. Yes
2.4 At the public meetings to develop the State plan, the DSU and SILC identify those provisions in the SPIL that are State-imposed requirements beyond what would be required to comply with the regulations in 34 CFR parts 364, 365, 366, and 367.Yes
2.5 The DSU will seek to incorporate into, and describe in, the State plan any new methods or approaches for the provision of IL services to older individuals who are blind that are developed under a project funded under chapter 2 of title VII of the Act and that the DSU determines to be effective. Yes
2.6 The DSU and SILC actively consult, as appropriate, in the development of the State plan with the director of the Client Assistance Program (CAP) authorized under section 112 of the Act. Yes

Section 3: Independent Living Services
3.1 The State, directly or through grants or contracts, will provide IL services with Federal, State, or other funds Yes
3.2 Independent living services shall be provided to individuals with significant disabilities in accordance with an independent living plan mutually agreed upon by an appropriate staff member of the service provider and the individual, unless the individual signs a waiver stating that such a plan is unnecessary. Yes
3.3 All service providers will use formats that are accessible to notify individuals seeking or receiving IL services under chapter 1 of title VII about:
• the availability of the CAP authorized by section 112 of the Act;
• the purposes of the services provided under the CAP; and
• how to contact the CAP.
Yes
3.4 Participating service providers meet all applicable State licensure or certification requirements. Yes

Section 4: Eligibility
4.1 Any individual with a significant disability, as defined in 34 CFR 364.4(b), is eligible for IL services under the SILS and CIL programs authorized under chapter 1 of title VII of the Act. Any individual may seek information about IL services under these programs and request referral to other services and programs for individuals with significant disabilities, as appropriate. The determination of an individual’s eligibility for IL services under the SILS and
CIL programs meets the requirements of 34 CFR 364.51.Yes
4.2 Service providers apply eligibility requirements without regard to age, color, creed, gender, national origin, race, religion or type of significant disability of the individual applying for IL services. Yes
4.3 Service providers do not impose any State or local residence requirement that excludes any individual who is present in the State and who is otherwise eligible for IL services from receiving IL services. Yes

Section 5: Staffing Requirements
5.1 Service provider staff includes personnel who are specialists in the development and provision of IL services and in the development and support of centers. Yes
5.2 To the maximum extent feasible, a service provider makes available personnel able to communicate:
• with individuals with significant disabilities who rely on alternative modes of
communication, such as manual communication, nonverbal communication, nonverbal
communication devices, Braille or audio tapes, and who apply for or receive IL services
under title VII of the Act; and
• in the native languages of individuals with significant disabilities whose English
proficiency is limited and who apply for or receive IL services under title VII of the Act.
Yes
5.3 Service providers establish and maintain a program of staff development for all classes of
positions involved in providing IL services and, if appropriate, in administering the CIL
program. The staff development programs emphasize improving the skills of staff directly
responsible for the provision of IL services, including knowledge of and practice in the IL
philosophy. Yes
5.4 All recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act
will take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with
significant disabilities on the same terms and conditions required with respect to the employment
of individuals with disabilities under section 503 of the Act. Yes

Section 6: Fiscal Control and Fund Accounting
6.1 All recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act
will comply with applicable EDGAR fiscal and accounting requirements and will adopt those
fiscal control and fund accounting procedures as may be necessary to ensure the proper
disbursement of and accounting for those funds. Yes

Section 7: Recordkeeping, Access and Reporting
7.1 In addition to complying with applicable EDGAR recordkeeping requirements, all recipients
of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will maintain
records that fully disclose and document:
• the amount and disposition by the recipient of that financial assistance;
• The total cost of the project or undertaking in connection with which the financial
assistance is given or used;
• the amount of that portion of the cost of the project or undertaking supplied by other
sources;
• compliance with the requirements of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act and Part 364 of the
regulations; and
• other information that the Commissioner determines to be appropriate to facilitate an
effective audit.
Yes
7.2 With respect to the records that are required by 34 CFR 364.35, all recipients of financial
assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will submit reports that the
Commissioner determines to be appropriate. Yes
7.3 All recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act
will provide access to the Commissioner and the Comptroller General, or any of their duly
authorized representatives, to the records listed in 34 CFR 364.37 for the purpose of conducting
audits, examinations, and compliance reviews. Yes
Section 8: Protection, Use and Release of Personal Information
8.1 Each service provider will adopt and implement policies and procedures to safeguard the
confidentiality of all personal information, including photographs and lists of names in
accordance with the requirements of 34 CFR 364.56(a)(1-6). Yes
Section 9: Signatures
As the authorized signatories, we will sign, date and retain in the files of the state agency(ies)
and the Statewide Independent Living Council the Part I: Assurances, 1-8, and the separate
Certification of Lobbying forms ED-80-0013 (available in MS Word and PDF formats) for the
state independent living program (Part B) and the centers for independent living program (Part
C).
The effective date of this SPIL is October 1, 2013.
Section 9: Signature for SILC Chairperson
Name Julia Beems-Miller
Title Chair, CO SILC
Signed? Yes
Date signed07/30/2013
Section 9: Signature for DSU Director
Name Todd Jorgensen
Title Acting Director, CO Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Signed? Yes
Date signed07/30/2013
Section 9: Signature for Separate State Agency for Individuals Who Are Blind
Is there a Separate State Agency for Individuals Who Are Blind? No
Name
Title
Signed? No
Date signed
The SILC, DSU and, if applicable, the separate state agency for individuals who are blind,
provide the following additional assurance(s) which RSA has deemed necessary to ensure the
state’s compliance with the assurances in sections 1 through 8, above, as a condition for approval
of this SPIL Yes
Enter text for additional assurance here:
Additional Assurances As a condition for Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)
approval of the FFY 2014-2016 Colorado State Plan for Independent Living, the Colorado
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Colorado Statewide Independent Living Council
(SILC) jointly assure RSA that, by December 1, 2013, they will submit documentation
demonstrating that the SILC has been brought into compliance with the requirement that each
SILC member serve for full three-year terms (except when a member is appointed to fill a
vacancy occurring prior to the expiration of a term) as well as with all other federal requirements
regarding SILC appointment, composition and terms outlined in 34 CFR 364.21(b) – (f).
Additional Assurances: Signature for SILC Chairperson
Name Anna French
Title SILC Chair
Signed? Yes
Date signed09/24/2013
Additional Assurances: Signature for DSU Director
Name Todd Jorgensen
Title Acting Director, DVR
Signed? Yes
Date signed09/24/2013
Additional Assurances: Signature for Separate State Agency for Individuals Who Are Blind
Is there a Separate State Agency for Individuals Who Are Blind? No
Name
Title
Signed? No
Date signed
The following information is captured by the MIS.
Additional assurances last updated on: 25-Sep-13 – 7:41 AM
Additional assurances last updated by: rsacotterd
Part II: Narrative: Section 1 – Goals, Objectives and
Activities
Section 1: Goals, Objectives and Activities 1.1 Goals and Mission
Describe the overall goals and mission of the State’s IL programs and services. The SPIL must
address the goals and mission of both the SILS and the CIL programs, including those of the
State agency for individuals who are blind as they relate to the parts of the SPIL administered by
that agency.
Goal Name: Goal 1 Identify Disability Population Hubs
Goal Description:
Mission
Colorado’s Independent Living Partners (DSU, SILC, and the Statewide Network
of Independent Living Centers) commit the next three years to re-establishing our
grassroots perspective, building the capacity of our IL centers, and improving
statewide access to independent living services. We will seek greater involvement
of the people we serve, exploring natural supports for community living. With our
stakeholders, we will help shape communities that recognize full inclusion and
diversity as a necessary part of community success and well-being.
Goal 1
Disability population hubs will be identified in both rural and urban areas,
allowing for more targeted outreach and efficient use of resources through the
SILC SPIL ad hoc committee.
Goal Name: Goal 2 Increase Capacity of Centers to provide services
Goal Description:
Goal 2
The IL Partners will work together to increase the capacity of centers to provide
services throughout their catchment areas.
Goal Name: Goal 3 Increase Involvement of Youth in Independent Living
Goal Description:
Goal 3
We will increase the involvement of youth in independent living programs,
creating a natural succession plan for the future of independent living.
1.2 Objectives
1.2A. Specify the objectives to be achieved and the time frame for achieving them.
Goal(s) from
Section 1.1
Objective to be achieved Time
frame start
date
Time
frame end
date
Goal 1 Identify
Disability
Population Hubs
Objective 1A: Gather information to
create an understanding of service
areas. YEAR ONE
Activities:
? use new census, ACS data, and other
relevant data groups to create maps
? Identify key towns/disability
populations (SILC ad hoc committee to
include at least two CIL directors)
? Create visual images of the state by
mapping:
o existing services & support groups
o existing IL services
o disability-specific populations
o disability populations by age
o homeless populations (Point in Time
Survey)
o other relevant data offered by IL
partners and stakeholders
(SILC and DSU)
? identify where outreach is needed
(SILC ad hoc committee)
10/01/2013 09/30/2014
Outcome Measure:
? Compilation of information
delineating existing populations of and
services already in existence for
Colorado’s citizens with significant
disabilities.
? survey CILs on helpfulness of data by
June 30, 2014.
Goal 1 Identify
Disability
Population Hubs
Objective 1B: Identify the service
needs of underserved populations.
YEAR ONE
Activities:
? survey communities on preferred
services, onsite and web (SILC ad hoc
committee will develop survey
questions; SILC, DSU and CILs will
post survey on websites; SILC will
conduct three focus groups based on
data collected in Objective 1A)
? survey communities on preferred
delivery methods, onsite and web
(SILC ad hoc committee will develop
survey questions; SILC, DSU and CILs
will post survey on websites; SILC will
conduct three focus groups based on
data collected in Objective 1A)
? Compile information to guide
outreach to underserved communities
in Colorado
10/01/2013 09/30/2014
Goal 1 Identify
Disability
Population Hubs
Objective 1C: Create a targeted
outreach plan YEAR ONE, After
completion of 1A and 1B
Activities:
? Use maps to identify potential
collaborations with local support
groups and service providers (CILs)
10/01/2013 09/30/2014
? develop standardized outreach
materials about the IL program (team
made up of DSU, SILC, CIL directors;
some financial support from SILC for
writing and printing)
? provide educational and other events
through collaborations with local
agencies (CILs)
? develop mechanism for sharing
outreach results among IL partners.
(DSU)
Outcome Measure: survey CILs on
new collaborations, materials
distributed, and outreach events by
September 30, 2014.
Goal 2 Increase
Capacity of
Centers to
provide services
Objective 2A: Staff Development
YEARS 1-3
Activities:
? IL training opportunities
o SILC will budget for 2 online
trainings per non-Part C center (4), per
year ONGOING
o The DSU and CILs in collaboration
with the SILC will host a statewide
conference for IL staff that will include
time for public input on the SPIL and
its implementation YEAR TWO
? Determine which of the ILRU
training modules will be required for
IL staff to complete to meet Title VII
qualified staff requirements (DSU)
YEAR ONE
? Create networking opportunities for
the SILC to identify local area issues,
including continuation of the SILC/IL
Staff committee (SILC, DSU, CILs)
10/01/2013 09/30/2016
ONGOING
* Support a rural CIL to apply for peer
mentoring through APRIL, ideas and
techniques can then be shared with
other CILs
? Make training available on:
o collaboration techniques for CILs to
work with community organizations
o using volunteers in a way that is
meaningful to the CIL and the
volunteer
YEAR TWO (DSU and CILs in
collaboration with the SILC)
Outcome Measures:
? CILs develop staff development and
training opportunity policies to ensure
qualified staff
? Each center will provide to the SILC
staff development and training
opportunities and number of staff
attending those trainings on a quarterly
basis.
? The DSU will compare compliance
reviews from 2010 and track
compliance review issues documented
during the current SPIL.
Goal 2 Increase
Capacity of
Centers to
provide services
Objective 2B: Support Resource
Development on statewide basis
Activities:
? solicit information from CILs on
diversified funding models and their
perceived best practices
? Solicit information from CILs about
subscriptions to aid resource
development that can be shared
10/01/2013 09/30/2015
amongst the network of Center (DSU)
YEAR ONE
? purchase subscriptions (DSU) YEAR
ONE
? The DSU and SILC will explore the
opportunity of hiring a VISTA or other
service agency staff to work with all
Colorado CILs in the following areas:
(Hire staff in YEAR ONE;
implementation in YEAR TWO)
o strategic planning training
o develop measurable outcomes for
fundraising
o grant writing training/support
o fee for service development
Outcome Measure: In the last quarter
of the SPIL, the SILC will produce a
report on increase in non-government
funding during the SPIL period.
Goal 2 Increase
Capacity of
Centers to
provide services
Objective 2C: Explore the use of
technology and non-traditional
methods for service delivery
Activities:
? Use 704 reports to determine
percentage of consumers served
outside of primary CIL office location
(DSU) YEAR ONE
? Gather information about the
provision of the four core services
delivered outside the main CIL offices
(DSU) and the preferred method of
delivery
o survey consumers and staff involved
in services outside main office (DSU
and SILC) YEAR ONE
10/01/2013 09/30/2016
? Gather information about rural
service delivery from national
resources and share with CILs (DSU
and CILs) YEAR TWO
? Report results of surveys/analyze
what is working best in both rural and
urban areas. (DSU and CILs with
results reported to the SILC) YEAR
TWO
? Facilitate staff from CILs with good
results helping other centers implement
new service delivery methods (DSU
and CILs) YEAR TWO and THREE
Outcome Measure: Use 704 reports
during the last quarter of the SPIL to
report on increase in services outside of
primary CIL locations.(DSU and CILs)
Goal 2 Increase
Capacity of
Centers to
provide services
Objective 2D: Develop a team to write
an annual report on the progress and
accomplishments of the IL Network.
Activities:
? Use 704 reports to collect
demographic data, track SPIL goal
accomplishments, identify Center best
practices, and results of consumer
preferences (Objective 1B) and
satisfaction surveys.
? Updates maps from Objective 1A.
Outcome Measure: Development of
report that will be shared with
stakeholders and potential funders
10/01/2013 09/30/2016
Goal 3 Increase
Involvement of
Youth in
Independent
Living
Objective 3A: Educate ourselves about
reaching out to youth in meaningful
ways.
Activities:
? collect information about existing
10/01/2013 09/30/2015
youth organizations and the SILC will
create report to share among IL
partners (DSU and CILs in
collaboration with the SILC) YEAR
ONE
? Develop relationships with other
youth service providers by attending
meetings and events and encouraging
participation on boards. (SILC, DSU
and CILs) YEAR TWO
? Branding IL for youth (SILC ad hoc
committee with CIL staff) YEAR
TWO
? Use social media and other culturally
appropriate methods to reach youth
(SILC, DSU and CILs) YEAR TWO
? Develop a Youth Advisory Ad Hoc
Committee, made up of youth with
disabilities (SILC) YEAR TWO
Outcome Measure: The development
of a SILC youth advisory committee
that will consist of 51% youth with
disabilities.
Goal 3 Increase
Involvement of
Youth in
Independent
Living
Objective 3B: Developing youth
leadership
Activities:
? Grow your own? interns by engaging
youth in the following activities at
CILs: (CILs) YEAR TWO
o Informational interview
o job shadowing
o internship
o Americorps
? a statewide youth summit (DSU and
CILs in collaboration with the SILC)
YEAR THREE
Outcome Measure: At least three
centers will provide opportunities to
train youth within their own programs.
Goal 3 Increase
Involvement of
Youth in
Independent
Living
Objective 3C: Involve youth at IL
centers
Activities:
? Develop culturally appropriate IL
marketing materials for other service
providers to give to youth (SILC, CILs)
YEAR TWO
? Orientation for transitioning youth
and parents (CILs) ONGOING
? Provide training on benefits during
transition (CILs) ONGOING
? Tours of centers-coordinated with
youth programs (CILs) ONGOING
? Participate in youth-focused events
(DSU in conjunction with the CILs)
ONGOING
Outcome measure: Compare the
number of youth served by CILs on
2012 704 Reports to those in the most
recent 704 Report. All 704 Reports
must be submitted to the SILC to
monitor SPIL implementation (DSU
and CILs) YEAR THREE
10/01/2014 09/30/2015
1.2 Objectives
1.2B Describe the steps planned regarding outreach to populations in the State that are unserved
or underserved by programs under title VII, including minority groups and urban and rural
populations.
• Identify the populations to be designated for targeted outreach efforts
Using information from the 2010 Census and the American Community Survey, the IL Partners
will reexamine disability population hubs throughout the state. By meeting Objectives 1A and
1B, we will have definitive data about the need for services and the best methods for delivering
those services. During the development of this SPIL, we have learned through public comment
and surveys that the deaf and hard of hearing population still have many unmet needs. The SILC
has learned from the last SPIL that Native Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, African Americans,
Pacific Islanders, 121 Program, and youth remain underserved and targeted for outreach.
Objectives 1B and 1C are designed to mitigate those circumstances. Objective 2A also provides
for intensive outreach training that will be offered to IL staff based on findings from Objectives
1A, 1B and 1C.
• Identify the geographic areas (i.e., communities) in which the targeted populations reside
Objectives 1A and 1B describe the ways that we intend to assess the needs in our rural and
frontier counties and determine whether current service methods are successful. Information
gathered directly from consumers and local service providers will provide guidance for targeted
outreach. Seventy-three percent of Colorado’s counties are considered either rural or frontier.
Rural counties (fewer than 50,000 individuals per county–24 counties) include: Alamosa,
Archuleta, Chaffee, Conejos, Crowley, Delta, Eagle, Fremont, Garfield, Grand, La Plata, Lake,
Logan, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, Otero, Ouray, Phillips, Pitkin, Prowers, Rio Grande,
Routt, Summit Frontier Counties (6 or fewer persons per square mile–23 counties) include:
Baca, Bent, Cheyenne, Costilla, Custer, Dolores, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Huerfano, Jackson,
Kiowa, Kit Carson, Las Animas, Lincoln, Mineral, Moffat, Rio Blanco, Saguache, San Juan, San
Miguel, Sedgewick, Washington, Yuma
• Describe how the needs of individuals with significant disabilities from minority group
backgrounds will be addressed
During the period of the previous SPIL, efforts to reach minority populations
failed. One training on cultural competency was offered to the CIL directors
during the last SPIL–it became evident that additional in-depth trainings are still
needed. Even though Colorado is not a racially diverse state, from our previous
704 reports we consider minority populations to continue to be underserved.
Objectives 1A, 1B and 1C describe new approaches to gather that information and
ensure that independent living services are available to minority populations.
1.3 Financial Plan
Describe in sections 1.3A and 1.3B, below, the financial plan for the use of Federal and non-
Federal funds to meet the SPIL objectives.
1.3A Financial Plan Tables
Complete the financial plan tables covering years 1, 2 and 3 of this SPIL. For each funding
source, provide estimated dollar amounts anticipated for the applicable uses. The financial plan
table should include only those funding sources and amounts that are intended to support one or
more of the objectives identified in section 1.2 of the SPIL. To the extent possible, the tables and
narratives must reflect the applicable financial information from centers for independent living.
Refer to the SPIL Instructions for additional information about completing the financial tables
and narratives.
Year 1 – 2014Approximate funding amounts and uses
Sources SILC
resource
plan
IL
services
General CIL
operations
Other SPIL
activities
Title VII Funds
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B 250000 30000
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C 1002657
Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only
those provided by the OIB grantee to
further a SPIL objective)
Other Federal funds – Sec. 101(a)(18) of
the Act (Innovation and Expansion)
Other Federal funds – other
Non-Federal funds – State funds 48500 2007288
Non-Federal funds – Other
Total 48500 0 3259945 30000
Year 2 – 2015Approximate funding amounts and uses
Sources SILC
resource
plan
IL
services
General CIL
operations
Other SPIL
activities
Title VII Funds
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B 250000 30000
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C 1002657
Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only
those provided by the OIB grantee to
further a SPIL objective)
Other Federal funds – Sec. 101(a)(18) of
the Act (Innovation and Expansion)
Other Federal funds – other
Non-Federal funds – State funds 61000 2007288
Non-Federal funds – Other
Total 61000 0 3259945 30000
Year 3 – 2016Approximate funding amounts and uses
Sources SILC
resource
plan
IL
services
General CIL
operations
Other SPIL
activities
Title VII Funds
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B 250000
Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C 1002657
Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only
those provided by the OIB grantee to
further a SPIL objective)
Other Federal funds – Sec. 101(a)(18) of
the Act (Innovation and Expansion)
Other Federal funds – other
Non-Federal funds – State funds 59000 2007288
Non-Federal funds – Other
Total 59000 0 3259945 0
1.3B Financial Plan Narratives
1.3B(1) Specify how the part B, part C and chapter 2 (Older Blind) funds, if applicable, will
further the SPIL objectives.
Part B and State funds will be used to fund the resource plan for the SILC.
Center operations will be funded through Chapter 1, Parts B and C funds in
addition to State General Funds. Several of the Centers will complete their spend
down of their ARRA funds during the course of this SPIL.
The three year time period covered by this SPIL will involve a great deal of
research and compiling of data to be carried out by the DSU, the SILC, and
representation from the IL Center directors. Outreach efforts to be carried out by
the Centers will be funded through Center operational funds. Staff training efforts
will be funded through the DSU and staff time committed to training funded
through center operational funds. Center-specific activities focused on youth will
be funded through operational funding.
1.3B(2) Describe efforts to coordinate Federal and State funding for centers and IL services,
including the amounts, sources and purposes of the funding to be coordinated.
Currently, Part B funds provide $30,000 for a SILC Coordinator; Part B funds are
also utilized to fund a portion of the IL Coordinator position. The remaining Part
B funds are combined with the State General Fund allocation to support the
Colorado State Independent Living Services (SILS) program. These funds are
allocated to nine of ten operating Colorado centers for independent living,
consisting of five Part C centers and four state funded centers. (Note: One Part C
center was out of compliance at the time of this SPIL development and was not
receiving State General or Part B funds). State General Funds are divided equally
amongst all 9 centers. Part B funds are allocated based on a five-tier system
developed to offset the disparities in Part C and local funding. This allocation
process is described in the CO IL Program’s Procedures Manual; State IL Rules
provide guidance on determining the allocation committee and developing the
formula. In order to receive SILS funding, all centers must be currently certified
in compliance with Title VII, Section 725 of the Federal Act, as defined in 34
CFR 366.60.
State General Funds for each center are approximately $2,007,288
Part B funds are distributed as follows:
Tier 1 includes centers which will each receive 3.5% of the total amount of Part B
funds available.
Atlantis
Tier 2 includes centers which will each receive 6.0% of the total amount of Part B
funds available.
CFI, CPWD
Tier 3 includes centers which will each receive 10.0% of available Part B funds.
CO Springs Independence Center
Tier 4 includes centers which will each receive 13% of available Part B funds.
CFD and Connections
Tier 5 includes centers which will each receive 15% of available Part B funds
DRS, ILC/NWCCI, SWIC
1.3B(3) Describe any in-kind resources including plant, equipment or services to be provided in
support of the SILC resource plan, IL services, general CIL operations and/or other SPIL
objectives.
NA
1.3B(4) Provide any additional information about the financial plan, as appropriate.
NA
1.4 Compatibility with Chapter 1 of Title VII and the CIL Work Plans
1.4A Describe how the SPIL objectives are consistent with and further the purpose of chapter 1
of title VII of the Act as stated in section 701 of the Act and 34 CFR 364.2.
The objectives of this SPIL include developing a foundation of service provision
for the next three years based on assessing IL service needs and the development
of an outreach plan tailored to meet the needs of un- and underserved populations
around the State. Information from consumers and other key stakeholders will be
collected through different mechanisms that take into account accessibility
preferences and the rural and frontier natures of significant portions of the State.
The viability of the IL network will be supported through resource development
opportunities on a statewide-basis supporting the provision of the four core
services. Relationship-building between youth and the ILCs will foster the
development of youth leaders in the state. The objectives included in Colorado’s
SPIL were developed with the input of Center directors, consumers, and other IL
stakeholders accomplishing them will require collaborative relationships amongst
all of the parties listed in 34 CFR 364.2. SPIL goals were incorporated into the
outcomes and performance measures for the SILS contract.
1.4B Describe how, in developing the SPIL objectives, the DSU and the SILC considered and
incorporated, where appropriate, the priorities and objectives established by centers for
independent living under section 725(c)(4) of the Act.
Gathering, reading and comparing the work plans from each center’s 704 report
was the first step in developing the goals of this SPIL. Next, IL directors
participated in an activity at a SILC meeting that provided the SILC and DSU
with the top five issues the directors wanted addressed in the SPIL. Three IL
directors participated on the SILC’s SPIL Committee.
1.5 Cooperation, Coordination, and Working Relationships Among Various Entities
Describe the steps that will be taken to maximize the cooperation, coordination and working
relationships among the SILS program, the SILC, and centers; the DSU, other State agencies
represented on the SILC and other councils that address the needs of specific disability
populations and issues; and other public and private entities determined to be appropriate by the
SILC.
The description must identify the entities with which the DSU and the SILC will cooperate and
coordinate.
The Colorado DVR, the SILC, and the Colorado Association of Centers for
Independent Living (ACCIL) have a strong, collaborative working relationship
based on open communication and coordinated efforts. The DSU’s IL
Coordinator, SILC chair and coordinator meet via conference call on a weekly
basis; the IL Coordinator and the SILC Coordinator participate in monthly
conference calls of the ACCIL; a representative of the SILC attends monthly SRC
meetings and provides SILC updates to the SRC and SRC updates to the SILC.
The IL Coordinator provides a DVR update to the SILC’s executive committee
and to the full SILC at SILC meetings to share information on the agency and to
provide a forum for questions, expressions of concerns and sharing of
information.
The SILC is actively seeking representation from State and community agencies
that will support the state in meeting the three goals included in this SPIL. The
SILC will be a member of the National Council on Independent Living and the
Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living.
Other state and community organizations that the SILC either has working
relationships with or will be seeking:
The Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council
The Colorado Advisory Council for Persons with Disability
The Rocky Mountain Americans with Disabilities Technical Assistance Center
Area Agency on Aging and Adult Resources
The Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
The Colorado Assistive Technology Program
The Veteran’s Administration
The SILC will begin and/or continue to cooperate and coordinate with state
agencies including but not limited to:
Department of Health and Human Services
Department of Housing
Department of Education Transition Services
State Coordinating Council on Transportation
State Medicaid Agency (Health Care Policy and Financing), specifically CTS, the
Colorado Community Choice Act, and the Medicaid Buy-In for Working Adults
with Disabilities.
The SILC’s outreach to un- and underserved populations will include the
following for Youth:
High School Transition Programs; the School-to-Work Alliance Program; State
Youth Council
For Deaf and Hard of Hearing: Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of
Hearing
For Ethnically Diverse (the needs assessment portion of this SPIL will assist to
identify gatekeepers into ethnic groups):
El Groupo Vida, ethnic chambers of commerce (Native American, Hispanic,
African American, Pacific Islanders), the 121 Program
For people with disabilities living in rural and frontier counties: social service
agencies, mental health providers, and DVR Counselors, Area Agencies on Aging
and Aging, other organizations and agencies addressing the needs of consumers
with significant disabilities
Long Term Care, including the Colorado Living Advisory Group and the
Regional Care Collaborative Organization
1.6 Coordination of Services
Describe how IL services funded under chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will be coordinated with
and complement other services to avoid unnecessary duplication with other Federal, State, and
local programs, including the OIB program authorized by chapter 2 of title VII of the Act, that
provide IL- or VR-related services.
There are objectives and activities in this SPIL that drive us toward more
collaboration and less duplication. Funds for the SILS program are used for core
services by CILs that are rarely offered by non- IL organizations.
1.7 Independent Living Services for Individuals who are Older Blind
Describe how the DSU seeks to incorporate into, and describe in, the State plan any new
methods or approaches for the provision of IL services to older individuals who are blind that are
developed under the Older Individuals who are Blind program and that the DSU determines to be
effective.
This SPIL coincides with a new 3 year funding period for the OIB program in
Colorado; innovative approaches to service provision in rural and frontier
counties will be incorporated into the annual IL report described in Objective 2D.
Part II: Narrative: Section 2 – Scope, Extent, and
Arrangements of Services
2.1 Scope and Extent
2.1A Check the appropriate boxes in the SPIL Instrument table indicating the types of IL
services to be provided to meet the objectives identified in section 1.2 of this SPIL, and whether
the services will be provided by the CILs or by the DSU (directly and/or through contract or
grant).
Table 2.1A: Independent living services Provided
by the DSU
(directly)
Provided by
the DSU
(through
contract
and/or grant)
Provided by
the CILs (Not
through DSU
contracts/
grants)
Core Independent Living Services – Information and
referral
No Yes Yes
Core Independent Living Services – IL skills training No Yes Yes
Core Independent Living Services – Peer counseling No Yes Yes
Core Independent Living Services – Individual and
systems advocacy
No Yes Yes
Counseling services, including psychological,
psychotherapeutic, and related services
No No No
Services related to securing housing or shelter,
including services related to community group living,
and supportive of the purposes of this Act and of the
titles of this Act, and adaptive housing services
(including appropriate accommodations to and
modifications of any space used to serve, or occupied
by, individuals with significant disabilities)
No Yes Yes
Rehabilitation technology Yes No No
Mobility training No Yes Yes
Services and training for individuals with cognitive
and sensory disabilities, including life skills training,
and interpreter and reader services
No Yes Yes
Personal assistance services, including attendant care
and the training of personnel providing such services
No Yes Yes
Surveys, directories and other activities to identify
appropriate housing, recreation, accessible
transportation and other support services
No Yes Yes
Consumer information programs on rehabilitation and
IL services available under this Act, especially for
minorities and other individuals with disabilities who
have traditionally been unserved or underserved by
programs under this Act
No Yes Yes
Education and training necessary for living in the
community and participating in community activities
No Yes Yes
Supported living No No No
Transportation, including referral and assistance for
such transportation
No Yes Yes
Physical rehabilitation No No No
Therapeutic treatment No No No
Provision of needed prostheses and other appliances
and devices
No No No
Individual and group social and recreational services No Yes Yes
Training to develop skills specifically designed for
youths who are individuals with significant
disabilities to promote self-awareness and esteem,
develop advocacy and self-empowerment skills, and
explore career options
No Yes Yes
Services for children with significant disabilities No No No
Services under other Federal, State, or local programs
designed to provide resources, training, counseling, or
other assistance of substantial benefit in enhancing the
independence, productivity, and quality of life of
individuals with significant disabilities
No Yes Yes
Appropriate preventive services to decrease the need
of individuals with significant disabilities for similar
services in the future
No Yes Yes
Community awareness programs to enhance the
understanding and integration into society of
individuals with disabilities
No Yes Yes
Other necessary services not inconsistent with the Act No Yes Yes
2.1B Describe any service provision priorities, including types of services or populations,
established for meeting the SPIL objectives identified in section 1.2.
The SILC, DSU and CIL Directors are working together to reach out to unserved
and underserved populations that will be identified by the completion of Goal 1.
The goals and objectives of this SPIL are organized in a manner to research,
analyze, and implement each component of the SPIL mission. Although we
believe we understand which populations are underserved, new information will
help us to be specific in our outreach, as well as learning the best methods of
service delivery to those populations.
2.1C If the State allows service providers to charge consumers for the cost of services or to
consider the ability of individual consumers to pay for the cost of IL services, specify the types
of IL services for which costs may be charged and for which a financial need test may be
applied, and describe how the State will ensure that:
• Any consideration of financial need is applied uniformly so that all individuals who are
eligible for IL services are treated equally; and
• Written policies and consumer documentation required by 34 CFR 364.59(d) will be kept
by the service provider.
Indicate N/A if not applicable.
N/A
2.2 Arrangements for State-Provided Services
2.2A If the DSU will provide any of the IL services identified in section 2.1A through grants or
contractual arrangements with third parties, describe such arrangements.
The DSU does not provide IL services directly, but utilizes the state contracting
system to contract with the network of IL Centers for the provision of the four
core IL services and any others identified by consumers. The contracts are the
funding vehicles through which State General and Part B funds flow to support
the general operations of the Center.
2.2B If the State contracts with or awards a grant to a center for the general operation of the
center, describe how the State will ensure that the determination of an individual’s eligibility for
services from that center shall be delegated to the center.
For State Fiscal Year 2014 (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014), the DSU awarded
$1,065,804 in State General Funds and estimates having $311,769 in Part B
Funds to award amongst the network of CILs through the State contracting
process.
The funding allocation percentages for all centers is as follows:
Part C Centers
Atlantis Community Inc.: 3.5%
Center for Disabilities: 13%
Center for Independence: 6%
Center for People with Disabilities: 6%
Connections for IL: 13%
DCIL/MHILC: 3.5%
Non-Part C Centers
CO Springs Independence Center: 10%
Disabled Resource Services: 15%
ILC/NWCCI: 15%
SWIC: 15%
Recipients of funding onhealthy.net must be state-certified and comply with the requirements of
Title VII Chapter 1, Part C regulations. Eligibility for IL services is determined by
individual CILs per Colorado State Rules.
Part II: Narrative: Section 3 – Design for the Statewide
Network of Centers
3.1 Existing Network
Provide an overview of the existing network of centers, including non-Part C-funded centers that
comply with the standards and assurances in section 725 (b) and (c) of the Act, and the
geographic areas and populations currently served by the centers.
There are 10 centers in the statewide network of centers that serve all 64 counties
with Part B and State General Funds. Nine of the 10 CILs are currently certified
with the state and only 6 of these are Part C CILs that cover 36 of the 64 counties.
The network provides cross disability services and depending upon their location
within the state, their underserved consumers may include: deaf and hard of
hearing, people of color, youth, and people living in rural and frontier counties.
CENTERS AND CATCHMENT AREAS (By County)
1. Atlantis Community, Inc., Denver:
Part C: Adams (shared with DCIL), Arapahoe (shared with DCIL), Boulder
(shared with CPWD), Denver (shared with DCIL), Douglas (shared with DCIL),
El Paso, Jefferson (shared with DCIL).
Part B and State General Fund:
Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Jefferson
2. Center for Disabilities, Pueblo:
Part C: Baca, Bent, Crowley, Custer, Fremont, Huerfano, Kiowa, Las Animas,
Otero, Prowers, Pueblo
Part B and State General Fund:
Alamosa, Baca, Bent, Conejos, Costilla, Crowley, Custer, Fremont, Huerfano,
Kiowa, Las Animas, Otero, Pueblo, Prowers, Rio Grande, Saguache
3. Center for Independence, Grand Junction:
Part C: Delta, Eagle, Gardield, Grand, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Jackson, Lake, Mesa,
Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, San Miguel.
Part B and State General Fund:
Delta, Chaffee, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Lake, Mesa, Montrose,
Ouray Pitkin, San Miguel
4. Center for People with Disabilities, Boulder:
Part C: Adams (shared with Atlantis and DCIL), Boulder (shared with Atlantis),
Weld (shared with Connections)
Part B and State General Funds: Adams (shared with Atlantis), Boulder,
Broomfield, Gilpin, Jefferson (shared with DCIL/MHILC).
5. Connections for Independence, Greeley:
Part C: Larimer, Morgan, Washington, Weld (shared with CPWD)
Part B and State General Funds: Logan, Morgan, Phillips, Sedgewick,
Washington, Weld, Yuma
6. Disabled Resource Services, Fort Collins
Part C: NA
Part B and State General Funds: Jackson, Larimer
7. The Independence Center, Colorado Springs:
Part C: NA
Part B and State General Funds: Cheyenne, Elbert, El Paso, Kiowa, Kit Carson,
Lincoln, Park, Teller
8. Southwest Center for Independence, Durango
Part C: NA
Part B and State General Funds: Archuleta, Dolores, LaPlata, Montezuma, San
Juan
9. NorthWest Colorado Center for Independence, Steamboat Springs
Part C: NA
Part B and State General Funds: Grand, Moffat, Rio Blanco, Routt, Summit
10. DCIL (DBA Mile High Independent Living Center), Denver
Part C: Adams (shared with Atlantis and CPWD), Arapahoe (shared with
Atlantis), Clear Creek, Denver (shared with Atlantis), Douglas (shared with
Atlantis), Elbert, Gilpin, Jefferson (shared with Atlantis)
NOTE: this Center was out of compliance and did not receive State General and
Part B funds at the time this SPIL was developed.
3.2 Expansion of Network
Describe the design for the further expansion of the network, including identification of the
unserved and underserved areas in the State and the order of priority for serving these areas as
additional funding becomes available (beyond the required cost-of-living increase).
All of Colorado’s 64 counties lie within the service area of either a Part C or non-
Part C Centers; 18 counties lie within the service areas of the state’s 4 non-Part C
Centers. Colorado will use the next three years to more accurately identify and
develop outreach to un- and underserved populations, develop non-traditional
methods of service delivery to rural and frontier counties and support the existing
centers to build their capacity. Although there is little expectation that there will
be a significant increase in existing funding streams, there is an increasing
possibility that funds may become available if a center or centers close, or if a
center is unable to expend it’s full Part B and State General Fund allocations.
The SILC and the DSU have identified the following 5 regions and 2 metro /urban
counties in the State that are not being served by Part C CILs, including:
Urban / Metro counties: Broomfield and Larimer.
Northwest counties: Moffat (Frontier), Rio Blanco (Frontier), and Routt (Rural).
Southwest counties: Archuleta (Rural), Dolores (Frontier), La Plata (Rural),
Montezuma (Rural), San Juan (Frontier).
South Central counties: Alamosa (Rural), Conejos (Rural), Costilla (Frontier),
Mineral (Frontier), Saguache (Frontier)
Central / Central Eastern counties: Chaffee (Rural), Cheyenne (Frontier), Kit
Carson (Frontier), Lincoln (Frontier), Park (Metro/Urban), Teller (Metro/Urban).
Northeast counties: Logan (Rural), Phillips (Rural), Sedgwick (Frontier),
Washington (Frontier), Yuma (Frontier).
If new, long-term, Part C funding becomes available during the course of this
Plan, Colorado has determined that the following conditions must be met before a
new Part C Center can be established within the five identified regions:
a). To avoid a funding cliff, a minimum commitment of $90,747 per year over
five years must be met with federal funds. This funding level to establish a Part C
Center in Colorado is based on funding that Connections for Independent Living
receives, the lowest-funded Part C Center in the state. Connections for IL serves
Morgan and Weld counties. Priority will be given to meet the needs of un- and
underserved populations identified through this SPIL with additional priority
given to the Urban/Metro counties, further delineation of priority areas will be
determined through this SPIL.
(b) A strong expression of need arises from the consumers and community in a
given area not currently covered by a center in receipt of Part C funds; and
(c) The area can feasibly support a new center.
Should an increase in federal funds not be enough to substantiate the need to
compete a center as indicated by the conditions listed above, any additional Part C
funds shall be allotted specifically to support the operations of centers as follows:
1. Provide financial support to Part C Centers, in compliance with the standards
and assurances, at the level of funding for the previous year if the current year is
less;
2. Provide a cost of living increase for existing Centers; and
3. Bring each of the current 6 centers meeting RSA’s standards and indicators for
CILs, up to a minimum base funding level commensurate with their current
funding proportions and accounting for the size and geographic nature of
corresponding catchment areas, ensuring that the established statewide network
and its infrastructure can be maintained.
4. If new Part C funds become available through a Center closure, the State will
utilize the following priorities for funding:
A. Re-examine the service area associated with the original Part C RFPs and
redesign the Part B catchment areas to align more closely with Part C CILs
already in existence;
B. Rebid the RFP within the state for either existing or new centers.
5. If additional Part B funds become available due to a center’s inability to spend
down allocated funds or due to center closure the priority for expenditure include:
A. Underfunded goals and objectives in the SPIL;
B. Unanticipated funding cuts;
C. Distribute to the network of state-certified centers utilizing the state’s
allocation formula for Part B Funds.
6. If additional State General Funds become available due to a center’s inability to
spend down allocated funds or due to a center closure, the priority for expenditure
is
A. Distribute to the network of state-certified centers utilizing the state’s
allocation formula for State General Funds.
Process for Establishing a New Center
Organizations that intend to become a state-certified Part B or State General
Funded center for independent living must apply to the Director of the Division of
Vocational Rehabilitation; the organization must demonstrate that it is complying
with the standards and assurances of Section 725 of the Rehabilitation Act and the
center evaluation standards in accordance with 34 CFR 366.60 and 366.64. This
process may include an on-site evaluation. If the DSU determines the organization
qualifies to operate as a center, it shall provide written certification for up to 36
months from the date of the compliance determination. Adding a new, instead of
replacing a closed, center could impact both State General and Part B allocation
formulas the funding priorities listed regarding opening a new Part C center must
be met.
Process for Closing a Center
A pre-requisite for Part B and SG funding in the state is certification by the DSU
and SILC. A center’s state certification can be revoked if it fails to meet the
requirements of 34 CFR366.40 366.46 or if it fails to meet contract requirements
within the statement of work and its exhibits. The DSU and the SILC may
institute a site evaluation outside of the Site Evaluation schedule based on review
of monthly reports and invoices, including lack of documentation and/or based on
changes in the number of people served as reported monthly, according to the
following procedures:
1. A site evaluation is scheduled utilizing the evaluation standards from 34 CFR
366.60 and 366.64; the evaluation may also include a financial audit performed by
the CDHS Auditor’s Office.
2. A monitoring report is submitted to the Center within 30 days of the site visit;
the Center has 45 days to respond with a Corrective Action Plan addressing any
compliance or audit findings; the DSU has 30 days to respond and either approve
the CAP or request further clarification. An extension of these timelines can be
requested by the Center, but approval rests with the DSU. Timelines for the
CDHS Auditors? Office are separate from the DSU’s.
3. If a Center does not complete it’s CAP within these timelines (including an
approved extension) the DSU can initiate the de-certification process, which
impacts the ability of the Center to contract or to continue contracting with the
State; a Center without an approved CAP 6 months into the State Fiscal Year
(January) will lose it’s certification and the remainder of it’s contract.
4. If a de-certified Center has not regained its certified-status within one month of
the beginning of the State Fiscal Year (May), it will not contract with the State for
that year.
3.3 Section 723 States Only
3.3A If the State follows an order of priorities for allocating funds among centers within a State
that is different from what is outlined in 34 CFR 366.22, describe the alternate order of priority
that the DSU director and the SILC chair have agreed upon. Indicate N/A if not applicable.
NA
3.3B Describe how the State policies, practices and procedures governing the awarding of grants
to centers and the oversight of these centers are consistent with 34 CFR 366.37 and 366.38.
NA
Part II: Narrative: Section 4 – Designated State Unit (DSU)
4.1 Administrative Support Services
4.1A Describe the administrative support services to be provided by the DSU for the SILS (Part
B) program and, if the State is a Section 723 State, for the CIL (Part C) program.
Refer to the SPIL Instructions for additional information about administrative support services.
The DSU utilizes Part B funds to provide a SILC Coordinator responsible for
supporting the SILC in achieving the goals and objectives of the state plan,
through the State contracting system. The job description is revised every three
years to ensure that the person hired for this position will meet the needs of the
SILC. The SILC Coordinator is supervised by the SILC Chair who also conducts
performance evaluations consistent with SILC by-laws, policies, and procedures
which ensures SILC autonomy from the DSU.
The DSU employs an FTE to serve as the state’s IL Program Coordinator. This
person is the designated liaison with the SILC, attends all SILC meetings and
provides technical assistance. The role of the ILPC with the network of Centers
includes monitoring, oversight, and technical assistance. The ILPC promotes
collaboration between the Centers, the SILC, and the DSU.
The DSU had employed a .25 FTE Administrative Assistant to provide support to
the IL Unit including the SILC. This position is considered to be a DSU position
and not a SILC staff position. Duties included arranging SILC meetings,
reimbursing SILC members for travel and other meeting expenses, paying SILC
bills and tracking SILC expenditures, providing a monthly financial report,
maintaining the SILC roster, distributing meeting notices, and other duties as
assigned. The AA vacated the position and due to a hiring freeze, the state has not
been able to re-fill it.
4.1B Describe other DSU arrangements for the administration of the IL program, if any.
NA
Part II: Narrative: Section 5 – Statewide Independent Living
Council (SILC)
5.1 Resource plan
5.1A Describe the resource plan prepared by the SILC in conjunction with the DSU for the
provision of resources, including staff and personnel, made available under parts B and C of
chapter 1 of title VII, section 101(a)(18) of the Act, and from other public and private sources
that may be necessary to carry out the functions of the SILC identified in section 705(c). The
description must address the three years of this SPIL.
• Refer to the SPIL Instructions for more information about completing this section.
For more information click the icon.
The SILC Resource plan is funded through two sources: Division of Vocational
Rehabilitation and Part B under Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act. Under the
General fund, the SILC has received $48,500 annually for at least three SPILs or
nine years. These funds are used to support the operating expenses of the SILC. In
addition the SILC receives $30,000 from Part B funds which funds the part time
coordinator who is a consultant on contract. This amount has not changed over at
least three SPIL cycles.
The SILC does not have an office or office related expenses except those that are
incurred by the DSU on the SILC’s behalf. The consultant works from his/her
own space and uses his/her personal computer and other equipment. Much of the
work of the SILC is done by committee using teleconferencing and at the five to
six formal meetings that the SILC conducts in various parts of the state.
The budget for the next three year cycle of the SPIL was set by the SILC Finance
Committee; the first year is based on the same figures from previous SPILs;
however, years 2 and 3 reflect additional funds to continue and expand the SILC’s
work on behalf of Coloradoans with disabilities and to meet the goals and
objectives included in this SPIL.
Year 1
Personnel
SILC Coordinator $30,000
The SILC Coordinator will remain a part time consultant at $30,000 annually.
This amount will cover the Coordinator’s time (20 hours a week), office expenses
and work related travel other than travel to formal SILC meetings. Travel to
formal SILC meetings will be covered in the operating budget.
Administrative Support in-kind
A part time administrative assistant will provide services to the SILC. This person
is responsible for setting up meetings and paying the bills of the SILC. The
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation provides administrative support through its
existing staff.
Total Personnel $30,000
Operating Expenses
Professional Services $5,000
The SILC pays for frequent updates to the SILC website and engages
professionals such as writers, facilitators, and trainers as needed to carry out the
work of the SILC.
Travel $10,000
This line item is used to pay for the travel of SILC members and the Coordinator
to bi-monthly SILC meetings held across the state. It is also used to pay for
committees, focus groups and outreach meetings that SILC members attend
across the state. Costs include mileage and other travel costs (cab, train, bus, van,
and on rare occasions air travel); hotel charges; and per-diem costs consistent with
2CFR230; Memorandum to Grantees Regarding the Use of Grant Funds for
Conferences and Meetings, U.S. Department of Education, June 2012 (GAN
Enclosure 7).
Meetings $7,000
This line item pays for the meeting costs such as room rental, catering, internet,
and other costs related to meetings.
Program Accommodations $5000
This line item funds disability-based accommodations needed by members or
other participants to fully participate in our meetings both face to face and by
telephone. Costs include sign language interpreters, alternate print and personal
assistance needs to travel and participate in SILC meetings.
Operating Costs $4,500
This line item covers conference calls, printing, postage, minor equipment
purchases, and general supplies. In the first year of this SPIL, there are funds to
supplement the mapping needs and disseminate information to the centers.
Training funds $6,500
These funds will be used to provide training for SILC members and CIL staff as
described in Objective 1A.
Conferences $5,000
The SILC hopes to send two people to the SILC Congress and hopes to participate
in at least one other national conference such as NCIL or APRIL.
Dues $ 1,500
This line item is to pay for dues for such organizations as NCIL and minority
organizations that promote outreach to underserved populations.
Miscellaneous $0.00
The SILC does not anticipate any miscellaneous costs at this time.
Needs Assessment $4,000
This line item covers the costs of focus groups, surveys, data collection, and data
analysis.
Total Operating Costs for Year 1 $48,500
YEAR 2
Personnel
SILC Coordinator $50,000
This position will remain a contract position but the expectation is that the SILC
Coordinator will go to full time at $50,000. The SILC expects that this person will
attend meetings in Denver and be the face of the SILC. In addition, he/she will
develop content for the SILC website, assist with the development of additional
issue briefs, conduct on-going needs assessment activities and support additional
SILC committees/workgroups on specific issues such as emergency preparedness,
housing, assistive technology, transportation and access to basic services such as
food and emergency/temporary housing.
Administrative Assistant in-kind
A part time administrative assistant will provide services to the SILC. This person
is responsible for setting up meetings and paying the bills of the SILC. The
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation provides administrative support through its
existing staff.
Total Personnel $50,000
Operating Expenses
Professional Services $9,000
The SILC pays for frequent updates to the SILC website and engages
professionals such as writers, facilitators, and trainers as needed to carry out the
work of the SILC. The DSU will engage a VISTA to act as a resource
development technician as described in Goal 2.
Travel $10,000
This line item is used to pay for the travel of SILC members and the Coordinator
to bi-monthly SILC meetings held across the state. It is also used to pay for
committees, focus groups and outreach meetings that SILC members attend
across the state. Costs include mileage and other travel costs (cab, train, bus, van,
and on rare occasions air travel); hotel charges; and per-diem costs consistent with
2CFR230; Memorandum to Grantees Regarding the Use of Grant Funds for
Conferences and Meetings, U.S. Department of Education, June 2012 (GAN
Enclosure 7).
Meetings $7,000
This line item pays for the meeting costs such as room rental, catering, internet,
and other costs related to meetings.
Program Accommodations $5,000
This line item funds disability-based accommodations needed by members or
other participants to fully participate in our meetings both face to face and by
telephone. Costs include sign language interpreters, alternate print and personal
assistance needs to travel and participate in SILC meetings.
Operating Costs $2,500
This line item covers conference calls, printing, postage, minor equipment
purchases, and general supplies.
Training funds $4,000
These funds will be used to provide training for SILC members and CIL staff as
described in Objective 1A.
Conferences $20,0000
In the second year of the SPIL, the SILC will provide resources for a statewide
conference for IL staff. One person will be sent to the SILC Congress.
Dues $ 1,500
This line item is to pay for dues for such organizations as NCIL and minority
organizations that promote outreach to underserved populations.
Miscellaneous $0.00
The SILC does not anticipate any miscellaneous costs at this time.
Needs Assessment $2,000
This line item covers the costs of focus groups, surveys, data collection, and data
analysis.
Total Operating Costs for Year 2 $61,000
YEAR 3
Personnel
SILC Coordinator $50,000
This position will remain a contract position. The SILC Coordinator will be full
time at $50,000. The SILC expects that this person will attend meetings in Denver
and be the face of the SILC. In addition, he/she will develop content for the SILC
website, assist with the development of additional issue briefs, conduct on-going
needs assessment activities and support additional SILC committees/workgroups
on specific issues such as emergency preparedness, housing, assistive technology,
transportation and access to basic services such as food and emergency/temporary
housing.
Administrative Assistant in-kind
A part time administrative assistant will provide services to the SILC. This person
is responsible for setting up meetings and paying the bills of the SILC. The
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation provides administrative support through its
existing staff.
Total Personnel $50,000
Operating Expenses
Professional Services $3,000
The cost of professional services is reduced as the fulltime SILC Coordinator
takes on more responsibility for writing and facilitation. Funds remain available
for services if needed and for the maintenance and updating of the SILC website.
Travel $10,000
This line item is used to pay for the travel of SILC members and the Coordinator
to bi-monthly SILC meetings held across the state. It is also used to pay for
committees, focus groups and outreach meetings that SILC members attend
across the state. Costs include mileage and other travel costs (cab, train, bus, van,
and on rare occasions air travel); hotel charges; and per diem costs consistent with
2CFR230; Memorandum to Grantees Regarding the Use of Grant Funds for
Conferences and Meetings, U.S. Department of Education, June 2012 (GAN
Enclosure 7).
Meetings $7,000
This line item pays for the meeting costs such as room rental, catering, internet,
and other costs related to meetings.
Program Accommodations $5,000
This line item funds disability based accommodations needed by members or
other participants to fully participate in our meetings both face to face and by
telephone. Costs include sign language interpreters, alternate print and personal
assistance needs to travel and participate in SILC meetings.
Operating Costs $2,500
This line item covers conference calls, printing, postage, minor equipment
purchases, and general supplies.
Training funds $4,000
These funds will be used to provide training for SILC members and CIL staff as
described in Objective 1A.
Conferences $20,0000
In the third year of the SPIL, the SILC will provide resources, in partnership with
DSU and CILs, for a statewide summit for youth with disabilities. Two SILC
members will attend SILC Congress. Funds permitting, one other national
conference will be attended by at least one SILC member.
Dues $1,500
This line item is to pay for dues for such organizations as NCIL and minority
organizations that promote outreach to underserved populations.
Miscellaneous $0.00
The SILC does not anticipate any miscellaneous costs at this time.
Needs Assessment and SPIL Development $5,000
This line item covers the costs of focus groups, surveys, data collection, data
analysis and other components of SPIL development.
Total Operating Costs for Year 3 $59,000
5.1B Describe how the following SILC resource plan requirements will be addressed.
• The SILC’s responsibility for the proper expenditure of funds and use of resources that it
receives under the resource plan.
The SILC finance committee develops an annual line item budget, allocating
adequate resources for meeting expenses, training, conferences, and meeting
objectives of the SPIL. The budget is reviewed by the finance committee which is
chaired by the SILC treasurer. A report of expenditures is furnished by the DSU
to the SILC. The finance committee looks at year-to-date expenditures,
percentages spent in each line item, and makes recommendations to the executive
committee about any adjustments that should be made. The SILC treasurer gives a
financial report at general SILC meetings, and members are provided with a copy
of the report.
• Non-inclusion of conditions or requirements in the SILC resource plan that may
compromise the independence of the SILC.
The SILC has discretion over its budget, within the parameters of state fiscal
rules.
• Reliance, to the maximum extent possible, on the use of resources in existence during the
period of implementation of the State plan.
The SILC carefully considers its responsibilities within the SPIL when developing
its budget. Because the SILC is not a non-profit and the state constitution does not
allow organizations within the state government to raise or receive outside funds,
the SILC has no choice but to manage its resources.
5.2 Establishment and Placement
Describe how the establishment and placement of the SILC ensures its independence with
respect to the DSU and all other State agencies. Refer to the SPIL Instructions for more
information about completing this section.
The Colorado SILC was established under Senate Bill 97-141. It is an
autonomous body with control over its finances for which the DSU is the
fiduciary agent. The SILC is awarded a budget amount by DVR, but creates is
own line item allocations and makes its own decisions about expenditures.
Members are appointed by the Governor through the Governor’s Office of Boards
and Commissions. The SILC has a process in place for recruiting, interviewing,
and recommending new SILC members. Recommendations are made to the
Governor’s Office of Boards and Commissions, and then appointments are made
by the Governor. The DSU plays no part in membership or financial decisions
other than ensuring compliance with State fiscal rules and the executive order that
established the Colorado SILC.
The SILC meets five to six times per year at different locations around the state in
order to hear public comment, be visible in the community, expend the travel
budget as equitably as possible and acquaint SILC members with Colorado’s
CILs. Committee meetings are usually accomplished by conference call. The
SILC staff person is supervised by the SILC chair, has a vendor contract with the
State, and is not directed by the DSU in any way. The IL Program Coordinator for
the DSU is an ex-officio, non-voting member of the SILC and subject to term
limits.
5.3 Appointment and Composition
Describe the process used by the State to appoint members to the SILC who meet the
composition requirements in section 705(b). Refer to the SPIL Instructions for more information
about completing this section.
The Colorado SILC, follows all mandates set out in Section 705 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. The Executive Order creating the
Colorado SILC has been amended to reduce the maximum number of SILC
members from 23 to15. These slots must be filled in accordance with Section 705.
The SILC By-Law reflects the same composition.
Although the SILC reviews applications and makes recommendations for
membership, the final membership decision is made by the Governor as
applications are presented by the Governor’s Office of Boards and Commission.
Boards and Commissions acknowledges the necessity of compliance with Section
705 and the Executive Order in regard to SILC composition. New members can
only be added if they do not adversely affect the balance of a majority of people
with disabilities who are not state or CIL employees. It is also the responsibility
of that office to determine which slot is to be filled, and whether the member fills
the remainder of an existing term or the full term of a vacancy. SILC By-Laws
reflect Section 705 and the Executive Order as to the term limits of two full three
year terms for any SILC member.
The DSU is included in this process by an internal memo that includes the entirety
of information to be forwarded to Boards and Commissions.
5.4 Staffing
Describe how the following SILC staffing requirements will be met.
• SILC supervision and evaluation, consistent with State law, of its staff and other
personnel as may be necessary to carry out its functions.
The SILC Coordinator contracts with the state to serve the SILC. The SILC
Coordinator works independently from a location other than the DSU, and is
supervised by the SILC Chair.
• Non-assignment of duties to SILC staff and other personnel made available by the DSU,
or any other State agency or office, that would create a conflict of interest while assisting
the SILC in carrying out its duties.
In the past, the DSU provided a.5 FTE Program Assistant who assisted the SILC
with anything that required access to the state accounting system or required
contracts or agreements with the state. Currently, the IL Program Coordinator
who serves as DSU liaison with the SILC must also provide the SILC’s
administrative support. As funds become available from the State, the SILC will
continue to advocate over the course of the SPIL for a Program Assistant who
would provide administrative support for the SILC and for the IL Program
Coordinator.
Part II: Narrative: Section 6 – Service Provider
Requirements
Describe how the following service provider requirements will be met:
6.1 Staffing
• Inclusion of personnel who are specialists in the development and provision of IL
services and in the development and support of centers.
The DSU monitors all ten centers for independent living, making sure that
services are being provided by qualified staff in compliance with 34 CFR 354.23.
The DSU requires that all Centers submit job descriptions showing job duties and
qualifications for funded staff with annual contract renewal.
• Availability, to the maximum extent feasible, of personnel able to communicate (1) with
individuals with significant disabilities who rely on alternative modes of communication,
such as manual communication, nonverbal communication devices, Braille, or audio
tapes and (2) in the native languages of individuals with significant disabilities whose
English proficiency is limited and who apply for or receive IL services under title VII of
the Act.
In addition to typical monitoring and site reviews, the DSU reviews the centers?
704 reports and takes note of each center’s ability to communicate in appropriate
alternative formats.
• Establishment and maintenance of a program of staff development for all classes of
positions involved in providing IL services and, where appropriate, in administering the
CIL program, improving the skills of staff directly responsible for the provision of IL
services, including knowledge of and practice in the IL philosophy.
The DSU and CILs for this SPIL have allocated funds to provide for the training
of CILs staff.
• Affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with
significant disabilities on the same terms and conditions required with respect to the
employment of individuals with disabilities under section 503 of the Act.
All Colorado Centers for Independent Living must have a non-discrimination
policy. Centers must also comply with the federal mandate that at least 51% of a
center’s staff be comprised of people with significant disabilities.
6.2 Fiscal Control and Fund Accounting
• Adoption of those fiscal control and fund accounting procedures as may be necessary to
ensure the proper disbursement of and accounting for funds made available through parts
B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act, in addition to complying with applicable
EDGAR fiscal and accounting requirements.
The DSU requires that all certified centers meet these fiscal requirements and
monitors accordingly. Independent audits are required annually through the
contract renewal process; the DSU monitors fiscal control and accounting
procedures during interactions that occur through processing monthly grant
invoices. The DSU has also entered into a close working relationship with the
Department of Human Services? Auditor’s Office, whose staff participate in
compliance site reviews and will be providing support in the development of a
financial monitoring tool for site review and center director use over the course of
this SPIL. Additionally, in accordance with the 2012 MTAG, all Part B Centers
will complete either a Cost Allocation Plan or Indirect Cost Rate over the course
of this SPIL.
6.3 Recordkeeping, Access and Reporting
• Maintenance of records that fully disclose and document the information listed in 34 CFR
364.35.
All contracts for independent living services and OIB services between the DSU
and the CILs require assurances of record keeping in compliance with federal
requirements. The DSU audits consumer service records as a typical element of a
site review.
• Submission of annual performance and financial reports, and any other reports that the
Secretary determines to be appropriate
Based on contractual agreement and state IL Rules, the DSU receives and reviews
the annual performance reports of the nine currently state-certified centers for
independent living by the designated date. Centers are required to maintain the
supporting documentation for fiscal control and fund accounting procedures that
insure proper use of and accounting for State and Federal funds. Monthly
reimbursements require an itemized invoice and service report. Centers will also
submit any other reports/data as may be requested by the Secretary or
Commissioner.
• Access to the Commissioner and the Comptroller General, or any of their duly authorized
representatives, for the purpose of conducting audits, examinations, and compliance
reviews, to the information listed in 34 CFR 364.37.
Records maintained and kept by Centers and the DSU, both fiscal and
programmatic, are kept in secure locations to ensure that independent auditors,
department and state auditors and any federal representative may review when
necessary.
6.4 Eligibility
• Eligibility of any individual with a significant disability, as defined in 34 CFR 364.4(b),
for IL services under the SILS and CIL programs.
Any individual with a significant disability is eligible for independent living
services as described in this document.
• Ability of any individual to seek information about IL services under these programs and
to request referral to other services and programs for individuals with significant
disabilities.
Information and referral continues to be a core service of all CILs, and is
available to eligible consumers upon request. Information and referral is also
available upon request from the SILC and the DSU about IL services/programs
and other service and programs for individuals with significant disabilities
• Determination of an individual’s eligibility for IL services under the SILS and CIL
programs in a manner that meets the requirements of 34 CFR 364.51.
To be deemed eligible for services, an individual must declare that he or she has a
significant disability that limits an activity of daily living and impedes his or her
ability to live independently in the community. Through State IL Rules, the
responsibility for determining eligibility for services has been given to the
individual centers.
• Application of eligibility requirements without regard to age, color, creed, gender,
national origin, race, religion, or type of significant disability of the individual applying
for IL services.
All CILs, the SILC, and the DSU have these policies in place to ensure that all
individuals, regardless of their protected classification, are eligible for services.
• Non-exclusion from receiving IL services of any individual who is present in the State
and who is otherwise eligible for IL services, based on the imposition of any State or
local residence requirement.
No eligible consumer is excluded due to residence requirements.
6.5 Independent Living Plans
• Provision of IL services in accordance with an IL plan complying with Sec. 364.52 and
mutually agreed upon by the individuals with significant disabilities and the appropriate
service provider staff unless the individual signs a waiver stating that an IL plan is
unnecessary.
Independent Living Plans, with goals and objectives mutually agreed upon, must
be included in the consumer service record, must be updated as necessary, and
must be fully explained to consumers who engage in CIL services.
6.6 Client Assistance Program (CAP) Information
• Use of accessible formats to notify individuals seeking or receiving IL services under
chapter 1 of title VII about the availability of the CAP program, the purposes of the
services provided under the CAP, and how to contact the CAP.
A document describing access to CAP services in the most appropriate format for
the consumer is issued during the IL intake, and a signed copy becomes part of
the consumer service record. The SILC and the DSU also provide this information
to individuals who may need additional assistance or wish to address a grievance
about a particular CIL.
6.7 Protection, Use and Release of Personal Information
• Adoption and implementation of policies and procedures meeting the requirements of 34
CFR 364.56(a), to safeguard the confidentiality of all personal information, including
photographs and lists of names.
A confidentiality agreement is a standard part of the IL intake process, and a
signed document is included in the consumer service record. Contracts with the
DSU require compliance with CFR 364.56 (a) and additionally require
compliance with HIPAA. The confidentiality policy is examined during site
reviews, and the use of the facility is observed and questions are asked regarding
the location of confidential discussions between consumer and CIL staff.
Part II: Narrative: Section 7 – Evaluation
Describe the method that will be used to periodically evaluate the effectiveness of the plan in
meeting the objectives established in Section 1. The description must include the State’s
evaluation of satisfaction by individuals with significant disabilities who have participated in the
program.
Section 7: Evaluation
Goal(s) and the
related
Objective(s) from
Section 1
Method that will be used to evaluate
Goal 1 Identify
Disability
Population Hubs
Disability population hubs will be identified in both rural and
urban areas, allowing for more target outreach and efficient use of
resources through the SILC SPIL ad hoc committee: The
compilation of statewide information that delineates both
consumers with disabilities and services already in existence will
lead to the development of a guide for the network of centers on
best practices in outreach to un- and underserved communities in
Colorado. This will lead to an increase in outreach to and
collaboration with local support groups and service providers for
un-and underserved communities.
Goal 2 Increase
Capacity of Centers
to provide services
The IL Partners will work together to increase the capacity of
centers to provide services throughout their catchment areas:
CILS will develop staff development and training opportunity
policies to ensure their staff are qualified; the number of staff
development and training opportunities will be tracked along with
the number of staff attending training from each Center.
A baseline of compliance review issues from the previous SPIL
will be established and compared to compliance review issues
documented during this SPIL to determine the effect of training
and staff development on the compliance review process. This
goal also includes a fund raising objective; in the last quarter of
the SPIL, the SILC will produce a report on increases in nongovernment
CIL-funding during the SPIL period. Data from 704
reports during the last quarter of the SPIL will be used to
determine increases in the provision of services offered outside of
the primary CIL locations.
Information, activities and results from this goal will be used for
the development and distribution of an annual report on the
progress and accomplishments of the IL Network.
Goal 3 Increase
Involvement of
Youth in
Independent Living
The IL Partners will work together to increase the involvement of
youth in independent living programs, creating a natural
succession plan for the future of independent living: the SILC will
develop a youth advisory committee that will consist of at least
51% youth with disabilities and will have identified methods
which IL service providers may utilize to reach youth in the state;
at least three centers will provide opportunities to train youth
within their own programs; 704 reports will be used to track
increases in youth service provision by IL Centers (with a baseline
from 2012 704 reports).
Part II: Narrative: Section 8 – State-Imposed Requirements
8 State-Imposed Requirements
Identify any State-imposed requirements contained in the provisions of this SPIL.
Operations of the SILC are constricted by state regulations governing the
operations of state agencies including reports required, accounting practices,
procurement rules, personnel policies, and travel reimbursement.

 

Calendar

June 30, 2017
  • SILC Membership Committee

    June 30, 2017 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am
    Teleconference

    See more details

July 7, 2017
  • SILC - Executive Committee Meeting

    July 7, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
    Teleconference

    Meeting is not open to the public

    See more details

July 18, 2017
  • SILC General Meeting- Meet & Greet

    July 18, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    Colorado Springs CIL - Independence Center

    Colorado Springs Independence Center
    729 S Tejon
    Colorado Springs, CO 80903
    (719) 471-8181

    See more details

July 19, 2017
  • SILC Meeting

    July 19, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
    Hotel Eleganté Conference & Event Center, 2886 S Circle Dr, Colorado Springs, CO 80906, USA

    Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
    Location: (Meeting room TBD)
    (719) 576-5900

    See more details

Colorado Independent Living Centers

*Satellite Office